Distributed Antenna Systems (DAS) have emerged as the ideal choice to meet the increasing in-building wireless coverage demand and provide the expected quality of experience (QoE), said Mr. Ayman Raba, managing director & CEO at Kathrein Middle East, speaking to Telecom Review.

Read more: KBOW & IoT: The new era of Kathrein’s solutions

Mobile chipset/platform manufacturer Qualcomm plays an important role in facilitating the next generation mobile technology platform and the internet of things (IoT). As a leading partner of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), Qualcomm enables emerging smartphone brands and connected device manufacturers to expand their global market and product footprint beyond phones into connected ecosystems, explains Jay Srage, President East Europe and MEA, Qualcomm, speaking to Telecom Review.

Read more: Qualcomm’s role in facilitating the next generation mobile ecosystem

Analyzing data is essential to successful smart city services, Labib Matta, chief business officer at NXN, told Telecom Review. Once a smart city consulting firm, NXN has grown into a full-fledged digital service provider with a list of heavyweight clients. Smart data analytics is the "key cornerstone" of NXN's services, said Matta - the essential component of its growing digital services portfolio.

Read more: Big data at the heart of NXN’s smart city as a service offering

Notes from the Chief Editor
Typography

For many years and at each conference or occasion, operators all talk about the threat from OTTs. Operators continue to invest in the network to better serve customers, yet OTTs do not share any costs while benefiting from the revenues.

This is a fact, but unfortunately, those from the industry association and organizations haven’t done anything to face this threat. Even the organizations which ally the largest operators of the world, such as the GSMA or government bodies like the ITU, have done nothing. Most regulators and more so the largest vendors and manufacturers remain silent.

Vendors are not far from this threat. The merge of many vendors and the catastrophic results are the best examples that OTTs have hit the whole cycle of telecoms.

Where is Motorola or Siemens? Where is Lucent?

Ninety percent of the devices business is shared between three major players, while the brands we love and have served the community, and that have created prime technology are disappearing, such as BlackBerry and Nokia. 

OTTs have taken advantage of these years to build cash, make acquisitions and tighten the grip on industry pillars. They are now making their network IP-based and have become more agile to compete.

Where are we now? Many operators have claimed a decline in their profit, some sharp declines and even some losses. The Q3 result was shocking, as ICT analysts have reviewed each quarter results for years. From Europe to Africa or the Middle East to everywhere... Is this a trend that will damage billions of operators’ investments and create huge jobs cuts that cannot be covered by OTTs despite opening so many regional offices? Hiring a few people will not solve the economic impacts of the damages created on social, financial and economic levels by the OTT threats.

How can this be solved?